[ARC] from Kids Can Press – 3

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Whenever Kids Can Press releases advanced reading copies of its children book I try to get them all.

Here, in random order, the reviews of the following children book:

    • The Day I Became a Bird by Ingrid Chabbert
    • A Squiggly Story by Andrew Larsen
    • The Pruwahaha Monster by Jean-Paul Mulders
    • On Our Way to Oyster Bay by Monica Kulling
    • Lucy and Company by Marianne Dubuc
    • The Branch by Mireille Messier

The Day I Became a Bird by Ingrid Chabbert

The little boy protagonist of the book, during the first day of school, falls in love with Sylvia, a schoolmate. But she has eyes only for birds: she loves to see them fly and tries to help them if they are injured.

How will he get Sylvia’s attention? But becoming a bird himself! A metal net and a something like feathers, and a big beak to complete the work. The boy wears the costume, but it’s hard to live a normal boy’s life with something so bulky on, let’s hope Sylvia notices him.

The book has minimal text and illustrations, and I liked them a lot (also the detailed ones about birds are very beautiful). The atmosphere is poetic and romantic, and I liked it.

Thanks to the publisher for providing me the copy necessary to write this review.

A Squiggly Story by Andrew Larsen

How can an author to begin a story? He needs some imagination to choose what have to happen in the story.

The book is about creating stories, imagination and about the fact everyone has particular ideas (Vampires or not? Sharks or not? And what about vampire sharks?). The content is interesting, but I did not particularly like the illustrations.

Thanks to the publisher for providing me the copy necessary to write this review.

The Pruwahaha Monster by Jean-Paul Mulders

A child is playing on a swing, and an evil monster wants to get him to eat him. The story had a good potential, the illustrations are good, both for the graphical features and the choice of colors, but the ending is hard to understand.

In the end it’s not clear what the story means, and this could work in an adult novel, but I think in a children book this only makes the reading experience complex.

Thanks to the publisher for providing me the copy necessary to write this review.

On Our Way to Oyster Bay by Monica Kulling

The book is about the true story of Mother Jones, who, to protest against children labor (during 1903), organized a march from Kensington, Pennsylvania, all the way to Oyster Bay, New York to confront president Theodore Roosevelt about the issue of child work.

The book is interesting and the illustrations are nice, I do not think it’s suited for younger children because of the long text – that sometimes could be quite complex.

Thanks to the publisher for providing me the copy necessary to write this review.

Lucy and Company by Marianne Dubuc

Lucy has some friends in the woods (a mice, a rabbit, a turtle) and they spend together the days and have adventurous time, and sometimes they meet also a bear!

The illustrations are the focus of the story, and they go, page after page, in almost a cinematograph effect, the text are few and short.

It’s a funny book, full of elements children like (animals, the woods, treasure hunting,…).

Thanks to the publisher for providing me the copy necessary to write this review.

The Branch by Mireille Messier

It’s night and there is a storm, and a small girl is dreaming about the most marvellous adventures on the tree near her house. In the morning she is upset in seeing her favorite branch on the ground, broken by the storm.

The adults want to take the branch away, but she does not want to let it go, but maybe her neighbour could help her in giving new life to the fallen branch.

Thanks to the publisher for providing me the copy necessary to write this review.


The Day I Became a Bird by Ingrid Chabbert ★★★★☆
* A Squiggly Story
by Andrew Larsen ★★☆☆☆½
* The Pruwahaha Monster
by Jean-Paul Mulders ★★☆☆☆½
* On Our Way to Oyster Bay
by Monica Kulling ★★★☆☆
* Lucy and Company
by Marianne Dubuc ★★★☆☆½
* The Branch
by Mireille Messier ★★★☆☆½

*I read this book in english

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