[ARC] from Kids Can Press – 4

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Here follow my comments about various children books Kids Can Press will publish in April 2017.

The books – listed in random order – are:

  • Spork by Kyo Maclear
  • The way home in the night by Akiko Miyakoshi
  • Lines, Bars and Circles: How William Playfair Invented Graphs by Helaine Becker
  • Stop Feedin’ da Boids! by James Sage
  • The Last Tree by Ingrid Chabbert
  • A Horse Named Steve by Kelly Collier

Spork by Kyo Maclear

Spork is the son of a spoon and a fork, and he does not belong to any of the two worlds, since he has a rounded pointy head.

Spork tries to look different, but his struggles aren’t useful, but one day he will discover he is perfect as he is.

It’s a nice tale with nice drawing, and the main characters are cutlery and kitchen utensils.

Thanks to the publisher for providing me the copy necessary to write this review.

 

The way home in the night by Akiko Miyakoshi

By Akiko Miyakoshi I’ve read and commented other two books (The Storm and The Tea Party in the Woods), and also in this case I think the image style compelling: the dark colors of the night and the rooms with light in which we see various animals going to sleep.

With respect to the other book by the author I think this one is less consistent in the plot, but concerning the images is  wonderful.

Thanks to the publisher for providing me the copy necessary to write this review.

Lines, Bars and Circles: How William Playfair Invented Graphs by Helaine Becker

The book targets oldest kids, and it tells in short the story of  William Playfair, who first invented the concept of lines, bar and circle charts to follow different economical phenomena. Like some innovators he was not taken seriously, but now his charts are useful in our daily life.

I liked William’s story, that is told also with some irony and with nice illustrations, but I also liked the way the books speaks about dreamers and inventors, since without them it will be impossible to progress as a society.

Thanks to the publisher for providing me the copy necessary to write this review.

Stop Feedin’ da Boids! by James Sage

Swanda used to live in the countryside, but she has recently moved into a town, where she do not have the same contact with nature and animals. She decides to feed the birds, and so she causes an invasion of pigeons in the neighbourhood.

It’s a nice book concerning the images, but I did not particularly liked the story.

Thanks to the publisher for providing me the copy necessary to write this review.

The Last Tree by Ingrid Chabbert

Two kids live into a town where concrete and buildings have replaced all the vegetation; the kids however find the last brave tree that is growing out from the asphalt, in an area where soon the construction of new buildings will begin!

The last tree has dark illustration that remind us how much we are growing apart from nature; the moral of the story is useful both to children and adults.

Thanks to the publisher for providing me the copy necessary to write this review.

A Horse Named Steve by Kelly Collier

Steve is a fancy and vain horse; when he finds a golden horn in the wood he decide to tie it around his head to be exceptional to the other animals.

In such a short book with funny drawings there are a lot of concepts: the desire to be better than other people, a simplification of how trends work and the beauty of being different from other beings.

Thanks to the publisher for providing me the copy necessary to write this review.


* Spork by Kyo Maclear ★★★☆☆
* The way home in the night by Akiko Miyakoshi ★★★☆☆½
* Lines, Bars and Circles: How William Playfair Invented Graphs by Helaine Becker ★★★☆☆
* Stop Feedin’ da Boids! by James Sage ★★☆☆☆
* The Last Tree by Ingrid Chabbert ★★★★
* A Horse Named Steve by Kelly Collier ★★★★☆

*I read this book in english

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